On Gathering and Scattering

golden-gate-bridge-690264_1280When the Assyrians conquered Israel in 722 BC, and also at the destruction of the Temple in 70 AD, both of these events displaced massive numbers of Jewish people from ancient Palestine and scattered them around the Middle East and Mediterranean. These scattered Jews became known as the Diaspora, and often for much of Jewish history, there were more Jewish people outside of Israel than in it. The Apostle Paul, born in Tarsus, was one of these people, and it pushed him in a direction God was able to use powerfully. He was a Jew, even a Pharisee. But he grew up in a Pagan dominant setting, and was also a Roman citizen. Paul became the apostle to the Gentiles, a people he understood, sent out from the Jewish people, whom he also understood. Paul was a bridge between two worlds. He became effective in what God was calling him to do, in some ways, because his people were scattered, because they felt so rootless and had to find a Jewish identity they could take out with them as they navigated the world as they found it.

This may seem like ancient history to a lot of people, dull and dusty, but I feel on many levels that I can relate to Paul’s attempts at bridge-making for God. I am sometimes thought of as a member of Generation X, that missing generation that is rare to find in churches. Whatever demographic labels, Generation X,Y, Z, or whatever you want to call young people these days, I am painfully aware that for a whole host of reasons young people in great numbers are not exactly showing up in droves at most churches in America. I am painfully aware also of how people under 50, and especially under 30, do not seem to value being a part of a worshipping community. I can’t speak for the church before my time obviously, but I have very rarely seen a church that seemed to represent people anything near equally across the spectrum of ages. And as a church leader who loves the church and feels called to try this work of bridge building, the future looks pretty bleak. The anchors of faith in the older generation are really not connecting or seem to be anything close to holding with the strength it takes to bridge the gap.

The people of this time are like a modern diaspora. Those who have an identity in Christ seem to be struggling to keep that identity, in the same ways keeping a Jewish identity in a Pagan nation faced an uphill battle. The young, both in and outside the church, are scattered; especially in the summer where countless options present themselves, anything from vacations to Pokemon Go to disc golf. The things that bind people together in relationship seem to be more strained than they ever were. So many people have divorced parents it is almost the new normal. People today struggle with the very concept of what it means to be part of a community, let alone a worshipping community. Even a sense of place or roots are challenged, as many seek to find jobs after college far away from their families and places of origin.

The digital world has connected people in ways that seemed unimaginable; but as much as I see evidence of what it connects I also see how it dissects. The digital divide is one more bridge, one more dimension of being a bridge maker that is crucial to engage in; one more factor of relationships in America that seem “a mile wide and an inch deep.” These last few months I hardly know which half of the church I will get to see on a given Sunday morning. Or how many will grow apart and never find their way back at the end of this high energy season.

As a young pastor, in all honesty, trying to bridge these worlds has not made me feel like the most  savvy and effective leader. It has brought me to a place of brokenness. It has made me well aware of the importance of relationships, and really, what is the church if it is not a spider-web of relationships, built around the gospel and a common connection in Christ?

As I attempt to engage this world as a “bridge builder for God” or an “apostle to the Americans,” Paul offers a great example to be emulated. He used every tool in his toolbox to be all things to all people. We see from scripture how he navigates and leads change in the face of division as the church boils in turmoil during the Jewish/Gentile cultural conflict. Paul plays his Pharisee card, and his Roman citizen card with great wisdom. He writes amazing letters to help guide the church. He debates with stoic and epicurean philosophers, and is familiar enough with their culture to engage it and point them to God using things they find familiar, even to the point of quoting poets. He points to an idol “to the unknown God” and declares boldly about the God who created the heavens and the earth. He raises up leaders like Timothy, Silas, Epaphras, Phoebe, and Lydia. He traveled hundreds of thousands of miles, had high profile engagements with government leaders, planted numerous churches, and fanned into flame the things the Holy Spirit was up to in holy obedience.

Like many young Christians, I look at what I see in the pages of the book of Acts, and I look at the state of the church today, and can’t help but ask the question, “What happened?” I believe that God is still the same, still desires the same things of us and still has plenty of power through which to act. I think a lot of why we don’t see God moving is because we have given up on seeing the importance of the work of bridge building. Rather than place the blame at the feet of older people, or younger people, I think it falls on all of us really. Each of us. When something is “everyone’s job” it can easily default to “no one’s job,” but really the burden rests on each of us to do that work. People across generations young or old, cannot expect the other to come to them. They must invest in relationships themselves, both inside and outside the church community. I know of an older couple and younger couple from the church who like, of all things, professional wrestling. They used that as a bridge to develop a relationship. Being “all things to all people” can look like that in this time. It has to look like something.

If Paul was alive today, he would be where the people are. He would be at our local racetrack that roars every Wednesday night with fair weather. He would use YouTube, Twitter, and modern communications effectively.  He would be actively raising up people to reach the world on its cultural terms…however sprawlingly complex and fluid. But more than that he would anchor the work of being a bridge in the solidity of deep relationships. That is the tricky part, especially in an age where it is so hard even to get five people’s schedule’s to align. The thing is, God didn’t send the “great at everything” Paul the Superstar. He sent me…and he sent you. And the work of reaching out to the world with the love of Christ as witnesses is the work of every Christian. This work is so worth doing it is worth doing badly… until we can learn what we need to learn to actually do it well. I feel like “badly” is all I have to offer right now…

My prayer lately is that God would gather us. We seem hopelessly scattered as the church of our day. We come from a culture that has a weak sense of place, a rugged sense of individualism. And one by one, things like worship, accountability, striving together to live lives of holiness, all seem not even make it anywhere near the “top ten” list of priorities we actually do. Don’t get me wrong, God can do great things with scattering. He can use it in amazing ways to turn even a former religious terrorist into the writer of over a third of the New Testament. But to truly learn the lessons of scattering does not mean finding comfort in isolation and disconnection, and learning to be happy in the midst of that desert. It does not mean each of us in our brokenness, pick up the pieces alone. I believe that we must also experience being gathered as the Body of Christ. We must tear down and uproot as much as build and plant. We must bridge the gap of spending time together regularly, not just sending emails and texts, or even phone calls. These are meant to be ways to bring us together physically, not as a substitute for actual human interaction.

And I think we should repent of wasting so much time on everything else. Older people, do not let discouragement let you justify not reaching out to busy young people. Younger people, do not let older people’s feeble attempts at showing love and cultural insensitivity to the reality of your rapidly changing world discourage you from lifting your voice. Do not criticize your worshiping community while refusing to be a part of it. Christ died for more than just a Sunday morning ritual, but we are all the church. When we think of the church as completely separate from ourselves it is a short step to casting the first stone.

If the church is ever to have revival, or awakening, unity has a role to play. It truly takes the whole body working together as one.

But in our scattered world, how can we have unity without first doing our part to fight for connection? If you feel lost and scattered in the wind, whose steps lead you there? Are you resistant to being gathered? If your only times of gathering are between nine to noon on Sunday morning—if you feel like it— are you resisting being gathered? Or scattered?

Dietrich said “Let him who cannot be alone beware of community… Let him who is not in community beware of being alone… Each by itself has profound perils and pitfalls.” Solitude and community need each other. Gathering and scattering need each other. Young and old need each other. And all of this requires us to think like bridge builders. A suspension bridge has pillars, but it also has deep pilings and strong tethers. It needs all these dimensions or it will collapse in a heap. As the cultural chasm widens and deepens, the work of connection becomes even harder, and even more important. We need to think like Paul would. He did not go to the Areopagus with hundred year old hymns in an archaic he did his best to take what was familiar to the outsider and pour the gospel in it. Seeking understanding without being willing to stand in the gap is not enough. We need prayer, but we also need presence. My question to you is will you be that presence?

Being a leader means I have to take an honest look at the future, and accept reality as it is. Nothing has made me cling more to the cross. Pray for me as I engage in this work God is calling me to, but I need more than that. I need colaborers. The only way to speak life into a scattered world is to not be scattered. But to be connected, and invested in this arduous labor of love God calls us to. I see fruit. I see signs of hope. But I also need to see now and then that I am not fighting alone.

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About jtower11

Hi there! I am James Tower: A husband, father, dreamer, visionary, thinker, poet, mystic, metal-worker, and scholar. A former atheist trying to find my way as a Quaker minister. A former drop-out trying to find my way through an M. Div program at George Fox. A former addict who, over twelve years ago had a life changing encounter with Jesus that has altered the course of my life forever. I am a creative person called to pastoral ministry, spiritual direction and discipleship. I love "conversations of consequence" with people who are willing to wrestle through the deeper truths and messiness of life. I have found God in my brokenness, and He has shown me how to use that personal knowledge to work toward healing and reconciliation with others. I love the outdoors, camping and recreation, an eclectic blend of music and arts, and creativity in general. I am passionate about expressing my faith in Jesus, and allowing God to transform every area of my life and every decision I make. Together with my wife Liz and daughters Sophie and Greta, we are on a journey to figure out where, when, and how to live out the call God has placed in our hearts. For more about me check out the "about" or "my story" pages. View all posts by jtower11

2 responses to “On Gathering and Scattering

  • Len maselli

    Well said brother. Hang in there! The testing of your faith will result in the James God designed you to be! Keep being honest without being cynical or bitter. God is stirring up His church and nudging Hid bride to get ready! He is using you and your great ability to “see”.
    Len

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